Defacing The Past - Damnation and Desecration in Imperial Rome by Calomino, Dario. 

Paperback, 231 pages, colour illustrations throughout

Like many rulers, Roman emperors used inscriptions, sculptures and coins to project their authority. But the imperial image could be outraged and subverted for political and religious reasons. The memory of Roman emperors and high-ranking officials could be officially condemned after their death through a process known as ‘damnatio memoriae’, meaning that a person’s memory was attacked and largely erased. This was particularly true if rulers were overthrown or executed. Their names were erased and their portraits defaced. Imperial images were also mutilated and destroyed by Rome’s enemies to contest the imperial authority. 


The exhibition Defacing The Past - Damnation and Desecration in Imperial Rome runs until the 7th of May 2017 at the British Museum 


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Defacing The Past - Damnation and Desecration in Imperial Rome by Calomino, Dario.

  • Product Code: 5093
  • Availability: In Stock
  • £25.00