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The Origins of Indian Coinage by Michael Mitchiner
The Origins of Indian Coinage by Michael Mitchiner
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The Origins of Indian Coinage by Michael Mitchiner

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The Origins of Indian Coinage by Michael Mitchiner 

Hawkins Publications, 1973. 200 pages, soft cover

Condition: Good but spine is slightly damaged - this is true for all remaining copies of the book in print. 


ISBN-10: 090417302X / ISBN-13: 978-0904173024

Author's Preface:

Although much as been written on the Indian punchmarked coinage there remain areas of uncertainty. With the aim of providing a solution to some of these problems evidence has been correlated from many sources that have previously only been considered in isolation. There emerges a coherent pattern of the coinage struck during the pre-Mauryan period by some dozen states distributed along the Indus, Narbada and Ganges River systems and along the eastern seaboard of Central India. Distinct regional tendencies are apparent with the north-western states striking their coins to a heavy weight standard and those in the south and east using a light standard while within each of these two groups the most easterly states used a coin type composed of a number of punchmarks and the western states used a single punch coin type. All four forms of punchmarked coinage were struck by different states during the sixth century before Christ and from this period on, although one sees the emergence of some new coin series, the dominant feature is the progressive expansion of the Magadhan Kingdom, an expansion that is reflected in her coinage by, among other features, the assimilation of the pre-existing mints in newly conquered regions as new provincial Magadhan mints that henceforth coined sequences of issues that paralleled those emitted from the main mint. This evolution of the Indian coinage is traced through the period when the Mauryan Empire, successor to the Kingdom of Magadha, dominated all but the far south on India and terminates with the decay of the Maurya - Sunga Empire in the early second century before Christ. 



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